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What factors does a court consider when making a child custody determination?

What factors does a court consider when making a child custody determination?

Here are the minimum factors the courts in Utah must consider in making a child custody award in divorce actions:

Utah Code Section 30-3-10. Custody of children in case of separation or divorce — Custody consideration.

(1)        If a married couple having one or more minor children are separated, or their marriage is declared void or dissolved, the court shall make an order for the future care and custody of the minor children as it considers appropriate.

(a)        In determining any form of custody, including a change in custody, the court shall consider the best interests of the child without preference for either parent solely because of the biological sex of the parent and, among other factors the court finds relevant, the following:

(i)         the past conduct and demonstrated moral standards of each of the parties;

(ii)        which parent is most likely to act in the best interest of the child, including allowing the child frequent and continuing contact with the noncustodial parent;

(iii)       the extent of bonding between the parent and child, meaning the depth, quality, and nature of the relationship between a parent and child;

(iv)       whether the parent has intentionally exposed the child to pornography or material harmful to a minor, as defined in Section 76-10-1201; and

(v)        those factors outlined in Section 30-3-10.2.

(b)        There is a rebuttable presumption that joint legal custody, as defined in Section 30-3-10.1, is in the best interest of the child, except in cases where there is:

(i)         domestic violence in the home or in the presence of the child;

(ii)        special physical or mental needs of a parent or child, making joint legal custody unreasonable;

(iii)       physical distance between the residences of the parents, making joint decision making impractical in certain circumstances; or

(iv)       any other factor the court considers relevant including those listed in this section and Section 30-3-10.2.

(c)        The person who desires joint legal custody shall file a proposed parenting plan in accordance with Sections 30-3-10.8 and 30-3-10.9. A presumption for joint legal custody may be rebutted by a showing by a preponderance of the evidence that it is not in the best interest of the child.

(d)       A child may not be required by either party to testify unless the trier of fact determines that extenuating circumstances exist that would necessitate the testimony of the child be heard and there is no other reasonable method to present the child’s testimony.

(e)        The court may inquire of a child and take into consideration the child’s desires regarding future custody or parent-time schedules, but the expressed desires are not controlling and the court may determine the child’s custody or parent-time otherwise. The desires of a child 14 years of age or older shall be given added weight, but is not the single controlling factor.

(f)        If an interview with a child is conducted by the court pursuant to Subsection (1)(e), the interview shall be conducted by the judge in camera. The prior consent of the parties may be obtained but is not necessary if the court finds that an interview with a child is the only method to ascertain the child’s desires regarding custody.

(2)        In awarding custody, the court shall consider, among other factors the court finds relevant, which parent is most likely to act in the best interests of the child, including allowing the child frequent and continuing contact with the noncustodial parent as the court finds appropriate.

(3)        If the court finds that one parent does not desire custody of the child, the court shall take that evidence into consideration in determining whether to award custody to the other parent.

(4)

(a)        Except as provided in Subsection (4)(b), a court may not discriminate against a parent due to a disability, as defined in Section 57-21-2, in awarding custody or determining whether a substantial change has occurred for the purpose of modifying an award of custody.

(b)        The court may not consider the disability of a parent as a factor in awarding custody or modifying an award of custody based on a determination of a substantial change in circumstances, unless the court makes specific findings that:

(i)         the disability significantly or substantially inhibits the parent’s ability to provide for the physical and emotional needs of the child at issue; and

(ii)        the parent with a disability lacks sufficient human, monetary, or other resources available to supplement the parent’s ability to provide for the physical and emotional needs of the child at issue.

(c)        Nothing in this section may be construed to apply to adoption proceedings under Title 78B, Chapter 6, Part 1, Utah Adoption Act.

(5)        This section establishes neither a preference nor a presumption for or against joint physical custody or sole physical custody, but allows the court and the family the widest discretion to choose a parenting plan that is in the best interest of the child.

(6)        When an issue before the court involves custodial responsibility in the event of a deployment of one or both parents who are servicemembers, and the servicemember has not yet been notified of deployment, the court shall resolve the issue based on the standards in Sections 78B-20-306 through 78B-20-309.

Utah Code Section 30-3-10.2 factors:

(30-3-10.2.  Joint custody order — Factors for court determination — Public assistance.)

(1)        The court may order joint legal custody or joint physical custody or both if one or both parents have filed a parenting plan in accordance with Section 30-3-10.8 and it determines that joint legal custody or joint physical custody or both is in the best interest of the child.

(2)        In determining whether the best interest of a child will be served by ordering joint legal or physical custody, the court shall consider the following factors:

(a)        whether the physical, psychological, and emotional needs and development of the child will benefit from joint legal or physical custody;

(b)        the ability of the parents to give first priority to the welfare of the child and reach shared decisions in the child’s best interest;

(c)        whether each parent is capable of encouraging and accepting a positive relationship between the child and the other parent, including the sharing of love, affection, and contact between the child and the other parent;

(d)       whether both parents participated in raising the child before the divorce;

(e)        the geographical proximity of the homes of the parents;

(f)        the preference of the child if the child is of sufficient age and capacity to reason so as to form an intelligent preference as to joint legal or physical custody;

(g)        the maturity of the parents and their willingness and ability to protect the child from conflict that may arise between the parents;

(h)        the past and present ability of the parents to cooperate with each other and make decisions jointly;

(i)         any history of, or potential for, child abuse, spouse abuse, or kidnaping; and

(j)         any other factors the court finds relevant.

(3)        The determination of the best interest of the child shall be by a preponderance of the evidence.

(4)        The court shall inform both parties that an order for joint physical custody may preclude eligibility for cash assistance provided under Title 35A, Chapter 3, Employment Support Act.

(5)        The court may order that where possible the parties attempt to settle future disputes by a dispute resolution method before seeking enforcement or modification of the terms and conditions of the order of joint legal custody or joint physical custody through litigation, except in emergency situations requiring ex parte orders to protect the child.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/What-factors-a-court-consider-while-making-a-child-custody-determination/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

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