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What are two lines of work that fit together well?

What are two lines of work that fit together well? For example, a remodeling contractor and a divorce lawyer.

I do not believe a lawyer or client would really want to interact with each other any more than necessary. I wouldn’t want to remodel my divorce client’s home, and I doubt that my client would want me remodeling his/her home either. 

But now you have me thinking. Perhaps one could practice law and write novels. The problem there is that if you’re really good at one of the two, you’re likely to be pretty mediocre at the other and want to give up the “sideline” as more trouble than it’s worth. That’s what John Grisham did (after he hit it big as a novelist he stopped practicing law and—based upon the scornful way he describes the practice of law and lawyers in his novels—joyously never looked back). 

It’s extremely hard to practice law profitably on a part-time basis, I can’t think of another line of work that fits together well with the practice of divorce law other than perhaps teaching a law class or two in law school or college. Even then, it wouldn’t be a “I have two part-time jobs I work equally” situation; you’d still be practicing law full-time. 

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277  

https://www.quora.com/What-are-two-lines-of-work-that-fit-together-well-For-example-a-remodeling-contractor-and-a-divorce-lawyer/answer/Eric-Johnson-311 

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Law from a legal assistant’s point of view, week 51

Law from a legal assistant’s point of view, week 51: Should you be a legal assistant?

By Quinton Lister, legal assistant  

One question you might be asking yourself if you have been reading my blog for the past year is, “Should I be a legal assistant?” Even if you are not asking yourself this question, I will answer it anyway because it is something that I do not merely feel, but know that I am more qualified now to address (and that I won’t get fired for addressing honestly). 

If you want to know if you should be a legal assistant, consider how you would answer the following questions: 

  • Do I want to learn more about what it is like to be a lawyer? Then you would likely benefit from being a legal assistant.  
    • In my mind, if I did not want eventually to be a lawyer myself, I would not gain much from doing my job as a legal assistant.  
    • Many times, legal work can be a thankless job, even for attorneys, so if you have no curiosity about what it is like to be a lawyer or what it means to work in a law practice, you can make the same money doing a different, less demanding job than that of legal assistant. 
  • Am I willing to humble myself and learn another culture and “dialect”?  
      • The legal profession can feel like landing in a foreign country when you first start. It has its own culture and it’s own “language”. And even though we’re still speaking English (with a little Latin mixed in) and living within a few miles of each other, the language and culture of the law is shockingly foreign.  
      • As is the case with learning and succeeding in any new culture and with any new language, you become immersed and fluent. That requires humility and patience. If you have those two things, coupled with an honest desire to work, you will do all right. 
  • Are you willing to make a lot of mistakes, get the wrong answer to questions, and learn from when you are wrong? The mark of a good lawyer, and by extension a good assistant is the ability to admit when one is in the wrong and to acknowledge that being in the wrong is often the result of being ignorant. The best work we can do comes when we are willing to make mistakes, report the mistakes (not waiting for our mistakes to be discovered), admit to the mistakes, and then learn from those mistakes so that we don’t repeat them. The faster and better you can do all that, the better legal assistant you will be. 

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277 

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Law from a legal assistant’s point of view, week 49

By Quinton Lister, legal assistant  

What is the one thing that would help decrease divorce in the United States?  

I honestly think that commitment to marriage as more than a legal institution would lead to less divorce. As society has begun to view marriage as merely a legal construct, we have begun to value marriage less and less. As we decrease the value of marriage we also decrease the importance of family. One peculiar instance of this phenomenon in action is the morals behind two recent Disney movies, Turning Red  and Encanto (before I go further, I will say that I liked one of these movies and did not like the other one). Each of these movies tells the story of a girl growing up in a highly structured culture in her family. Each movie seeks to deconstruct the family culture the main character is born into, and each of them champion the value of overcoming family tradition and culture to “truly be oneself”. The interesting thing about each of these movies is the idea that the individual is more important than the family unit. Now, to be clear, there are family dynamics that are unhealthy that need to be fixed, but the hyper focus on the individual clearly undermines the necessity of sacrifice inherent in marriage and family relationships. We do give up part of ourselves in order to be one with others, and that is not always a bad thing. Spencer Kimball put it so well: “In serving others, we ‘find’ ourselves in terms of acknowledging divine guidance in our lives. Furthermore, the more we serve our fellowmen . . . the more substance there is to our souls. [I]ndeed, it is easier to “find” ourselves because there is so much more of us to find!” Placing the needs and success of the family ahead of our own is, one of the best things we can do for ourselves. Healthier and happier marriages make healthier and happier individuals. And healthier, happier people make up the best families. Not to put to fine a point on it: you need a family, and your family needs you.  

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277 

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Law from a legal assistant’s point of view, week 47: The Healer’s Art

By Quinton Lister, legal assistant  

One thing my boss, attorney Eric Johnson, has told me that has had an impact on my view of law is the idea that law was traditionally supposed to be a healing profession. I myself will be starting law school soon and will be learning more comprehensively the ins and outs of the legal profession, and I think that the best lawyers that I have seen seek to bring their clients healing. 

There is an important distinction I need to make here. I am afraid that there are some out there who would think that what I am saying is that good lawyers get their clients what they want or avoid conflict. That is not what healing is in my opinion. You would not want a doctor who only performs you the procedure that you want at the expense of the procedure that you need. To truly bring about justice and appropriate mercy, a good lawyer must uphold the law, and that means not just giving the client what the client wants. It also means not running from conflict every time it arises because conflict is part of life (and some conflicts can be resolved only by confronting and overcoming them, not avoiding or compromising them). The healing comes from doing what is right by your client but also what is fair to the opposing party. Healing comes at times through conflict, but keeping an eye on what the absolute truth of any given situation is, at least when it comes to the law. 

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277 

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Law from a legal assistant’s point of view, week 20: Lawyers

By Quinton Lister, legal assistant

My boss at the law firm where I work (Utah Family Law, LC) has informed me more than once that, “divorce lawyers are, with few exceptions, terrible people”. I am still not sure how I feel about assigning this description to all divorce lawyers (my boss is a divorce and family lawyer, after all, and he’s not a terrible person; he didn’t pay me to say that either), but I have definitely started to see some of the things that would lead my boss to come to this conclusion in my short time as his assistant. 

For instance, the process of divorce cases could be much shorter, but for the problems the lawyers cause, needlessly. So often the case drags out over a span of years. This costs people tens of thousands of dollars. I have learned that a case rarely, if ever, must drag out so long, so what factors ensure that it does when it does? One of the factors is that divorce attorneys generally make more money the longer a case drags on. If the legal profession and court system want more respect and trust, they need to address and mitigate the incentive bad lawyers have to make a profit by doing their clients a disservice in this manner. 

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277 

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Does a judge contact a client if a law firm is filing to remove themselves from a case?

Does a judge contact a client if a law firm is filing to remove themselves from a case?

No.

A judge is not allowed to communicate with a represented party privately with that party or even with that party’s attorney. So if that represented party’s attorney(s) move(s), to withdraw as that party’s counsel, that party is still represented until the motion for permission to withdraw is granted. That fact prevents the judge from communicating with that party or that party’s attorney directly.

Generally speaking, if a party is proceeding pro se (i.e., representing himself/herself and is not being represented by a lawyer), a judge can communicate with that party, but not without ensuring that the other party (or other party’s attorney, if the party is represented by an attorney) is at least notified of the communication or preferably taking part in the communication at the same time with the judge and the party with whom the judge initiated communication.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Does-a-judge-contact-a-client-if-a-law-firm-is-filing-to-remove-themselves-from-a-case/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

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