BLANK

Tag: motion to enforce

What Would Happen if One Parent Does Not Bring Their Child for a Utah Court-Ordered Custody Exchange?

First, we need to learn and understand the term for violating a court order. That term is “contempt of court.” In Utah, one commits contempt of court in a civil proceeding (like a child custody case in a divorce or between unwed parents) if, and only if, all of the following criteria are met:

As a general rule, in order to prove contempt for failure to comply with a court order it must be shown that the person cited for contempt knew what was required, had the ability to comply, and intentionally failed or refused to do so. The district court must make explicit findings, whether written or transcribed, on the three elements of contempt. In a civil contempt proceeding, those elements must be proved by clear and convincing evidence.

(Koehler v. Allen, 466 P.3d 738, 2020 UT App 73 (Court of Appeals of Utah))

So, if the parent did not meet for the child custody or visitation/parent-time exchange because his/her car was out of commission or because the flight home was delayed for weather or because he/she was in a coma (you get the idea), then that parent couldn’t be held in contempt because a) that parent did not have the ability to comply (at least at that time), and b) did not intentionally fail or refuse to comply with the court’s order, that parent cannot be held in contempt.

If the parent could comply with the order and intentionally violated the order, that parent can be held in contempt.

To hold a parent in contempt, you would need to file a motion to hold the parent in contempt. You could move for (but are not required to move for) sanctions against the parent for his/her contemptuous actions. Here is where you can find the forms for this, if you want to file them yourself, instead of retaining the services of an attorney to file and prosecute the motion for you (warning: rarely do people who aren’t attorneys fill out, file, and serve these forms correctly, and oftentimes a winning motion is lost because of it):

Motion to Enforce Order (utcourts.gov)

What kinds of sanctions can the court impose for contempt of court for noncompliance with the child custody and parent-time orders?

See Utah Code Section 78B-6-316:

Utah Code § 78B-6-316.  Compensatory service for violation of parent-time order or failure to pay child support.

(1) As used in this section, “obligor” means the same as that term is defined in Section 81-6-101.

(2) If a court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that a parent has refused to comply with the minimum amount of parent-time ordered in a decree of divorce, the court shall order the parent to:

(a) perform a minimum of 10 hours of compensatory service; and

(b) participate in workshops, classes, or individual counseling to educate the parent about the importance of complying with the court order and providing a child a continuing relationship with both parents.

(3) If a custodial parent is ordered to perform compensatory service or undergo court-ordered education, there is a rebuttable presumption that the noncustodial parent be granted parent-time by the court to provide child care during the time the custodial parent is complying with compensatory service or education in order to recompense him for parent-time wrongfully denied by the custodial parent under the divorce decree.

(4) If a noncustodial parent is ordered to perform compensatory service or undergo court-ordered education, the court shall attempt to schedule the compensatory service or education at times that will not interfere with the noncustodial parent’s parent-time with the child.

(5) The person ordered to participate in court-ordered education is responsible for expenses of workshops, classes, and individual counseling.

(6) If a court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that an obligor has refused to pay child support as ordered by a court in accordance with Title 81, Chapter 6, Child Support, the court shall order the obligor to:

(a) perform a minimum of 10 hours of compensatory service; and

(b) participate in workshops, classes, or individual counseling to educate the obligor about the importance of complying with the court order and providing the children with a regular and stable source of support.

(7) The obligor is responsible for the expenses of workshops, classes, and individual counseling ordered by the court.

(8) If a court orders an obligor to perform compensatory service or undergo court-ordered education, the court shall attempt to schedule the compensatory service or education at times that will not interfere with the obligor’s parent-time with the child.

(9) The sanctions that the court shall impose under this section do not prevent the court from imposing other sanctions or prevent any person from bringing a cause of action allowed under state or federal law.

(10) The Legislature shall allocate the money from the Children’s Legal Defense Account to the judiciary to defray the cost of enforcing and administering this section.

What else can the court order?

See Utah Code Section 78B-6-310:

Utah Code § 78B-6-310.  Contempt — Action by court.

(1) The court shall determine whether the person proceeded against is guilty of the contempt charged. If the court finds the person is guilty of the contempt, the court may impose a fine not exceeding $1,000, order the person incarcerated in the county jail not exceeding 30 days, or both. However, a justice court judge or court commissioner may punish for contempt by a fine not to exceed $500 or by incarceration for five days or both.

(2) A fine imposed under this section is subject to the limitations of Subsection 76-3-301(2).

And you can ask for the court to award you the fees and court costs you incurred in having to prepare and prosecute the motion to enforce the domestic relations order and for sanctions as well.

Should I call the police?

Whether to call the police depends on the circumstances, but generally, I discourage calls to the police simply because a parent refuses to obey a court order to meet to exchange custody of the children. If there is real concern (real concern) that a parent has absconded with or kidnapped a child, a call to the police is more than warranted, but calling the police in the hope that they will coerce or intimidate a parent into complying with the custody exchange orders usually doesn’t work and often makes you (if you call the police) look spiteful. And it upsets the police (they feel they have much better things to do than respond to calls of noncompliance with child custody exchange orders). Better to report the noncompliance to the police by calling them, reporting the noncompliance with a brief description of what happened, and asking the police department to make a record and give you the incident number for the report. That way, when you move to hold the contemptuous parent in contempt, you have proof that you were complying at your end and did complain to the police about it.

But I thought that noncompliance with child custody and parent-time orders is a crime.

In Utah, it is a crime (see Utah Code Section 76-5-303 (Custodial Interference)), but with extraordinarily rare exception, law enforcement officers simply refuse to enforce it. I’ve never witnessed anyone being arrested or even cited for it. Better to report the noncompliance to the police by calling them, reporting the noncompliance with a brief description of what happened, and asking the police department to make a record and give you the incident number for the report. That way, when you move to hold the contemptuous parent in contempt, you have proof that you were complying at your end and did complain to the police about it. That way you have documented the noncompliance and your reasonable efforts to enforce it to the extent that the police are willing to do anything connected with enforcement (which is, admittedly very little).

What if this is a chronic problem (the other parent repeatedly doesn’t show up for exchanges)?

If the other parent is shamelessly flouting the custody and parent-time exchange orders, and if you have a long enough history you can prove (and you can prove the no-shows are intentional), that could, if it’s egregious enough, constitute a basis for a modification of the child parent-time and/or child custody awards themselves. If you can prove that the chronic noncompliance constitutes “a substantial and material change in the circumstances upon which custody was awarded” and “that a modification is in the best interests of the child,” to remedy the problems being caused by these substantial and material change in the circumstances (See Hudema v. Carpenter, 1999 UT App 290, ¶ 22, 989 P.2d 491), you might prevail on such a petition.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
Click to listen highlighted text!