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Can a divorced spouse claim rights to a previous primary residence?

Can a divorced spouse claim rights to a previous primary residence?

A court can, in exceptional circumstances, award a spouse some or all of your premarital and separate property that is clearly not a marital asset. In the jurisdiction where I practice family law (Utah), the rule in caselaw is:

Dunn v. Dunn, 802 P.2d 1314 (Utah Ct.App. 1990):

The general rule is that equity requires that each party retain the separate property he or she brought into the marriage, including any appreciation of the separate property. Burt v. Burt, 799 P.2d 1166, 1168 (Utah Ct.App.1990) (separate property, in this case inherited property, includes “its appreciated value” during the marriage). Exceptions to this general rule include whether the property has been commingled, whether the other spouse has by his or her efforts augmented, maintained, or protected the separate property, and whether the distribution achieves a fair, just, and equitable result. Id.; Noble v. Noble, 761 P.2d 1369, 1373 (Utah 1988).

Elman v. Elman, 245 P.3d 176 (Utah Ct.App. 2002):

In distributing property in divorce proceedings, trial courts are first required to properly categorize the parties’ property as marital or separate. See, e.g., Kelley v. Kelley, 2000 UT App 236,¶ 24, 9 P.3d 171. Generally, trial courts are also required to award premarital property, and appreciation on that property, to the spouse who brought the property into the marriage. See Dunn v. Dunn, 802 P.2d 1314, 1320 (Utah Ct.App.1990); see also Mortensen v. Mortensen, 760 P.2d 304, 308 (Utah 1988).

6¶ 19 However, separate property is not “totally beyond [a] court’s reach in an equitable property division.” Burt v. Burt, 799 P.2d 1166, 1169 (Utah Ct.App.1990). The court may award the separate property of one spouse to the other spouse in “ ‘extraordinary situations where equity so demands.’ ” Id. (quoting Mortensen, 760 P.2d at 308); see also Rappleye v. Rappleye, 855 P.2d 260, 263 (Utah Ct.App.1993) (“ ‘Exceptions to this general rule include whether … the distribution achieves a fair, just, and equitable result.’ ” (quoting Dunn, 802 P.2d at 1320)).

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Can-a-divorced-spouse-claim-rights-to-a-previous-primary-residence/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

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Can a divorced spouse claim rights to a premarital primary residence?

Can a divorced spouse claim rights to a premarital primary residence?

A court can, in exceptional circumstances, award a spouse some or all of your premarital and separate property that is clearly not a marital asset. In the jurisdiction where I practice family law (Utah), the rule in caselaw is:

Dunn v. Dunn, 802 P.2d 1314 (Utah Ct.App. 1990):

The general rule is that equity requires that each party retain the separate property he or she brought into the marriage, including any appreciation of the separate property. Burt v. Burt, 799 P.2d 1166, 1168 (Utah Ct.App.1990) (separate property, in this case inherited property, includes “its appreciated value” during the marriage). Exceptions to this general rule include whether the property has been commingled, whether the other spouse has by his or her efforts augmented, maintained, or protected the separate property, and whether the distribution achieves a fair, just, and equitable result. Id.; Noble v. Noble, 761 P.2d 1369, 1373 (Utah 1988).

Elman v. Elman, 245 P.3d 176 (Utah Ct.App. 2002):

In distributing property in divorce proceedings, trial courts are first required to properly categorize the parties’ property as marital or separate. See, e.g., Kelley v. Kelley, 2000 UT App 236,¶ 24, 9 P.3d 171. Generally, trial courts are also required to award premarital property, and appreciation on that property, to the spouse who brought the property into the marriage. See Dunn v. Dunn, 802 P.2d 1314, 1320 (Utah Ct.App.1990); see also Mortensen v. Mortensen, 760 P.2d 304, 308 (Utah 1988).

6¶ 19 However, separate property is not “totally beyond [a] court’s reach in an equitable property division.” Burt v. Burt, 799 P.2d 1166, 1169 (Utah Ct.App.1990). The court may award the separate property of one spouse to the other spouse in “ ‘extraordinary situations where equity so demands.’ ” Id. (quoting Mortensen, 760 P.2d at 308); see also Rappleye v. Rappleye, 855 P.2d 260, 263 (Utah Ct.App.1993) (“ ‘Exceptions to this general rule include whether … the distribution achieves a fair, just, and equitable result.’ ” (quoting Dunn, 802 P.2d at 1320)).

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Can-a-divorced-spouse-claim-rights-to-a-previous-primary-residence/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

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What if you don’t get divorced and just move away?

What if you don’t get divorced and just move away?

The risks and dangers in just up and moving away from (abandoning) your spouse are manifold. Here are a few that come to mind:

  • If you disappear and your spouse files for divorce and you cannot be found to be served with a copy of 1) the summons and 2) complaint for divorce, you could have default judgment entered against you without your knowledge and without you having appeared in the action to defend yourself.
    • you may lose most or all of the marital assets (even your premarital assets) by having them awarded to your spouse;
    • you may be ordered to pay most or all of the marital debts and obligations; and
    • you may be ordered to pay unfair amounts of child and/or spousal support
  • You are still responsible to care for your spouse, which means (at least in the jurisdiction where I practice divorce and family law) that if your spouse incurs debts and obligations for what are known as “necessaries”:

Morrison v. Federico, 232 P.2d 374 (Utah 1951):

The statute making “expenses of the family” chargeable upon the property of both spouses and permitting them to be sued jointly and separately, places liability upon both parties only where expenses incurred are necessary for the family benefit including expenditures proper to support the family and necessary to promote the well-being of its members and does not include attorney’s fees for legal services performed in a contemplated divorce action where reconciliation occurs.

  • 30-2-9. Family expenses–Joint and several liability:

(1) The expenses of the family and the education of the children are chargeable upon the property of both spouses or of either of them separately, for which expenses they may be sued jointly or separately.

(2) For the expenses described in Subsection (1), where there is a written agreement signed by either spouse that allows for the recovery of agreed upon amounts, a creditor or an assignee or successor in interest of the creditor is entitled to recover the contractually allowed amounts against both spouses, jointly and severally.

(3) Subsection (2) applies to all contracts and agreements under this section entered into by either spouse during the time the parties are married and living together.

(4) For the purposes of this section, family expenses are considered expenses incurred that benefit and promote the family unit. Items purchased pursuant to a written contract or agreement during the marriage that do not relate to family expenses are not covered by this section.

(5) The provisions of Subsections (2) and (3) do not create a right to attorney’s fees or collection fees as to the nonsigning spouse for purchases of:

(a) food or clothing; or

(b) home improvements or repairs over $5,000.

——————

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/What-if-you-don-t-get-divorced-and-just-move-away/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

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Can one spouse or the other avoid paying taxes on a joint tax?

Can one spouse or the other avoid paying taxes on a joint tax?

Tax law does not require married couples to file joint income tax returns simply by virtue of being married. So there is no such thing as a “joint tax” in that regard.

Spouses have the option of filing jointly or separately but are not required to file jointly.

Most married couples choose to file their tax returns jointly because there are generally greater tax savings and refunds available to those who file jointly.

This article also has some very interesting, very useful information about when it may make sense for a married couple to file their income tax returns separately. I have provided some excerpts below.

When married couples should file separate tax returns (by Ray Martin, CBS MoneyWatch)

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/when-married-couples-should-file-separate-tax-returns/

Unreimbursed medical expenses

“Unreimbursed out-of-pocket medical expenses can be claimed as an itemized deduction for amounts that exceed 7.5 percent of the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income. But if a couple has AGI of $140,000 and one spouse has incurred $10,000 of out-of-pocket medical expenses, none of these medical costs are eligible because they don’t exceed the 7.5 percent threshold, which in this example would be $10,500.

“However, if this couple files separately and the one who incurred the medical expenses of $10,000 has AGI of just $30,000, then $7,750 of the medical expenses could be eligible. Combined with other allowable deductions (charitable donations, mortgage interest, the SALT deduction limit of $5,000 for a married separate filer), this could significantly exceed the standard deduction for separate filers, which is $12,000 for each.

You don’t trust your spouse

“A very good reason good reason to file separately is because you don’t feel comfortable signing a joint tax return with your spouse, which both spouses must do when filing jointly. When you file jointly, you take full responsibility with your spouse, and both signers are responsible for the completeness and accuracy of the entire tax return, and each will each bear full responsibility to the IRS for any additional tax, penalty or interest due on an incorrect tax return.

“If you don’t want to merge your tax life with your partner, choosing the separate filing status offers a degree of financial protection because you’re responsible only for your own separately filed tax return.

Separated spouses

“Another good reason to file separate tax returns is that you and your spouse live separately but aren’t yet divorced. In that case, separate returns can help keep your finances separate. This can be especially beneficial if one of the spouses can qualify for head of household status because he or she is supporting the dependent children.

*****

The marriage penalty

“Another closely related tax topic involving marital status concerns the so-called marriage penalty. It refers to the situation when two people with the same income would pay more tax if they get married and file a joint return than if they stay single and file separately as singles.”

To find out whether it makes sense for you and your spouse to file separately or jointly, it’s worth consulting an accountant or tax preparer now, so that you are prepared to file your best return come April 15th. The fee charged for a consultation is well worth it for what it can save you in taxes.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Can-one-spouse-or-the-other-be-able-to-avoid-paying-taxes-on-a-joint-tax-Is-that-considered-fraud/answer/Eric-Johnson-311?prompt_topic_bio=1

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