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Tag: standard

Do judges sometimes feel overburdened by the responsibilities of their job?

Yes, and for good reason. First, let me be unusually but sincerely candid: many judges and many of the actions that judges take disappoint me. There are some excellent judges on the bench who are clearly skilled in the law and know how to apply it accurately, justly, and equitably. Would that all judges lived up to this standard. But not all judges do. I mention this so that the context of my answer to your question is clear.

Being a judge is, in my opinion, mostly a thankless job. Sure, there are some obvious perks to being a judge, including, but not limited to, a good salary, state and federal holidays off, most judges receive a generous pension when they retire, the prestige of being called “Your Honor,” but the burdens of being a judge are in some ways unimaginable. Can you conceive of sentencing someone to life in prison or death? Or even sentencing someone to 5 to 10 years in prison when you’re not certain of his or her guilt? Can you imagine what it must be like to spend your work week, week after week, hearing hundreds of stories of lying, cheating, robbing, destroying property, assaulting, raping and murdering? It all takes an inevitable toll on even the strongest of people. Those judges who do the best they can and do the job well day after day, year-over-year deserve not only our respect, but our sympathy, our thanks, and support.

All that stated, there are clearly some judges who are not cut out for the job and need to quit. Some need to quit because they are not competent as judges. Some need to quit because, while they might have been up to the demands of the job in the beginning, they aren’t anymore. Some need to quit before they become so jaded that they cannot give the job and the people who come before them the attention both the job–and the cases they hear and decide–deserve.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Do-judges-sometimes-feel-overburdened-by-the-responsibilities-of-their-job/answer/Eric-Johnson-311?prompt_topic_bio=1

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Has the ability of lawyers to advertise been beneficial to our legal system?

Unquestionably, yes.

Now don’t misunderstand me. When I say that the ability of lawyers to advertise has been unquestionably beneficial to our legal system, that does not mean I’m saying it has been nothing but beneficial to our legal system. Overall, the benefits outweigh the detriments.

While the most visible lawyer advertising is almost universally cheesy and in bad taste (and from only a few kinds of lawyers, mostly personal injury, disability, bankruptcy, and tax lawyers, and maybe divorce lawyers), and in some cases even misleading, the fact that lawyers can advertise makes it easier for people to be aware of lawyers’ services and how to make contact with lawyers to seek those services, so that they can get help through those services.

It would be wonderful if all advertising were held to a standard that prohibited any advertising that was false or misleading. But no such standard exists because no such standard can exist. Advertising is all around us and can be overwhelming. Advertising on and around every corner can be—and frequently is—an eyesore. Still, we benefit from advertising because it makes us aware of (free of charge to us and without us having to go to any effort to explore on our own) the goods and services available to us. Our lives are richer and safer and healthier and more enjoyable, etc. because we are made aware of the goods and services out there that but for advertising we would never learn of. Lawyer services are no exception.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Has-the-ability-of-lawyers-to-advertise-in-the-media-been-beneficial-to-our-legal-system/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

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