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Tag: victimized

Child refuses to leave noncustodial parent’s house. What happens now?

I am the noncustodial parent. Our child came to my house for parent-time and now refuses to leave because he wants to live with me. What happens now?

I will answer this question in the context of my experience as a lawyer in the jurisdiction where I practice divorce and family law, which is Utah.

This is a weird area of Utah law because you’ll hear the legislature and the courts tell you that children don’t get to choose where they live, and then when children do that very thing (i.e., refuse to live where the court orders them to live), the courts find themselves essentially powerless to change anything. At least that’s my experience over the 24 years I’ve been in practice.

Now before some of you start licking your lips and scheming, thinking, “I’m the noncustodial parent, but I can change that by simply telling our child to choose to refuse to return to the custodial parent’s house,” you need to be aware of the realities.

If you’re the noncustodial parent and your child or children are under the age of 14 or so, and they claim that they don’t want to live with the custodial parent, there’s a very good chance that the court is going to believe that you are a puppet master who coached the children or otherwise induced or coerced them into claiming they want to live with you. That may not be true, but you’re going to be met with that kind of skeptical presumption. So if you are the noncustodial parent with young children who you assert claim they don’t want to live with the custodial parent, you have an uphill battle ahead of you. If you are the noncustodial parent and a father, you have an almost impossibly uphill battle ahead of you.

If, however, your children are 14 years or older, and you are the noncustodial parent with whom your children say they want to live, it will be harder for your ex and/or the court to presume that the children are lying and/or don’t have good reasons for wanting to live with you. Again, if you are the father making this claim, your claim will be met with more skepticism than if you were the noncustodial mother making such a claim. Why is this? Because there is a pernicious belief in the legal system that fathers are generally worse parents than our mothers, that fathers don’t want custody of their children, and that the only reason fathers would seek custody of their children is to avoid paying child support. As a result of these beliefs, fathers who seek custody of their children are met with not just skepticism, but often derisive skepticism. Forewarned is forearmed.

So, if you are a noncustodial parent who is good and decent, and your child honestly and sincerely comes to you saying, “mom/dad, I can’t stand living with the custodial parent anymore, and I want to live with you,” how do you proceed?

First, if the child refusing to live with the custodial parent because the child just wants to spend more time with you and/or less time with the custodial parent, and the custodial parent is not neglecting or abusing the child in any way, then you as the noncustodial parent have both a legal and moral obligation to talk the child into going back to the custodial parent’s home, or if persuasion doesn’t work, imposing limitations and restrictions and punishments upon the child so that the child won’t get the impression that he or she is in charge. At the same time, the custodial parent needs to acknowledge the child’s desires to spend more time with the noncustodial parent as being a legitimate concern that needs to be addressed and resolved, and that usually means the custodial parent agreeing to give the child and the noncustodial parent more time together. If the custodial parent refuses to do the right thing, you may ask whether it’s wise to petition the court for a modification of the child custody award, so that you and the child get more time together. Unfortunately, odds are that if you file a petition to modify child custody and the only basis for your petition is the child’s desire to spend more time with you, you will probably lose. While it is technically and conceivably possible to win such a petition, usually the courts in Utah require more than just the child’s desire as the basis for a modification. And what form does this “more” take? Typically, you would have to show that the custodial parent is neglecting and/or abusing the child to get a modification of the child custody award.

Second, if the child is refusing to reside with the custodial parent because the custodial parent is truly neglectful and/or abusive, and if you have independently verifiable proof of this, you have the option of petitioning the court to modify the child custody award, changing the custodial parent from your ex to you. While that petition is pending, your child may refuse to return to the custodial parent’s home, and for reasons at least you and the child know to be valid. Whether the court allows your child to stay with you depends upon how your court views the situation and what is best for the child.

If you find yourself in this kind of situation, whether you are the custodial parent or the noncustodial parent, this is one of those situations where you need to seek good legal advice immediately, to help ensure that neither you nor the child is victimized.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

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Would you divorce your spouse if he/she had a child before marriage without telling you?

Would you divorce your husband if he had a child with his last relationship without telling you?

I do not believe that this would, alone, be reason to divorce your husband. He may be a good man who was a scared, confused kid back when he kept this from you. He may have matured since then. He may just have not known how to level with you (or perhaps wondered—albeit wrongly—whether he should). If he has come to regret keeping you in the dark, if you believe that, and if he has come clean and promised that there are no other skeletons in his closet, he may be a better man for it. It may well be that he is “worth” forgiving and not worth breaking up a marriage/family over it.

If discovering his illegitimate child is just the latest in a series of embarrassing/concerning facts that further reveal and confirm him as a) someone you did not believe him to be and b) as someone who cannot be trusted to deal with you honestly, then this latest disclosure may the proverbial straw that breaks the camels back. You may be more than justified in divorcing him; not because he has a child, but because he keeps secrets from you, because you simply cannot take further risks of being deceived such that you and/or your family will be victimized as a result.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

https://www.quora.com/Would-you-divorce-your-husband-if-he-had-a-child-with-his-last-relationship-without-telling-you/answer/Eric-Johnson-311

 

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Would you divorce if your spouse had a child before marriage without telling you?

Would you divorce your husband if he had a child with his last relationship without telling you?

I do not believe that this would, alone, be reason to divorce your husband. He may be a good man who was a scared, confused kid back when he kept this from you. He may have matured since then. He may just have not known how to level with you (or perhaps wondered—albeit wrongly—whether he should).

If he has come to regret keeping you in the dark, if you believe that, and if he has come clean and promised that there are no other skeletons in his closet, he may be a better man for it. It may well be that he is “worth” forgiving and not worth breaking up a marriage/family over it.

If discovering his illegitimate child is just the latest in a series of other embarrassing/concerning facts that further reveal and confirm him as a) someone you did not believe him to be and b) as someone who cannot be trusted to deal with you honestly, then this latest disclosure may the proverbial straw that breaks the camel’s back. You may be more than justified in divorcing him; not because he has a child, but because he keeps secrets from you, because you simply cannot take further risks of being deceived such that you and/or your family will be victimized as a result.

Utah Family Law, LC | divorceutah.com | 801-466-9277

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